Modulation of the gut microbiota by dietary interventions to prevent cardiometabolic diseases

Modulation of the gut microbiota by dietary interventions to prevent cardiometabolic diseases

OVERVIEW

  • In a study of 307 participants, the Mediterranean-style diet was associated with a composition of the gut microbiota conducive to good cardiometabolic health.
  • In another study, intermittent fasting altered the gut microbiota and prevented the development of hypertension in rats that spontaneously became hypertensive as they aged.
  • The metabolism of bile acids modulated by the microbiota has been identified as a regulator of blood pressure.
  • Dietary interventions aimed at modifying the gut microbiota could be a viable non-pharmacological approach to prevent and treat high blood pressure and other conditions.

Cardiometabolic diseases including type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease are on the rise in Canada and around the world. These diseases, which reduce the quality of life and life expectancy of those affected and generate significant costs for society, can be prevented by maintaining good lifestyle habits, including a healthy diet and regular exercise.

Recent studies have linked microbial metabolism and immune interactions in the gut and the risk of cardiometabolic disease (see our articles on the subject herehere and here). Two new studies show that the type of diet and the frequency of meals have effects on the risk of metabolic disease, which are in part due to alterations in the gut microbiota. The results of these new studies suggest that modulation of the gut microbiota by dietary interventions could be a new preventive and therapeutic approach.

US researchers analyzed the microbiome data of 307 male participants in the Health Professionals Follow-up Study as well as their eating habits and biomarkers of blood glucose regulation, lipid metabolism and inflammation. The Mediterranean-style diet (consisting mainly of vegetables, legumes, fruits, nuts, olive oil, and some wine and red meat) was associated with a composition of the gut microbiota conducive to good cardiometabolic health. The positive association between the Mediterranean-style diet and a lower risk of cardiometabolic disease was particularly strong among participants whose microbiota contained little Prevotella copri bacteria. Researchers do not yet understand why the Mediterranean diet is less effective in people whose microbiota contains the bacterium Prevotella copri, however, they make several hypotheses that will need to be verified in future studies. In any case, it can be envisaged that prevention approaches may one day be personalized according to the intestinal microbial profile of each person.

Benefits of intermittent fasting for hypertension
Intermittent fasting involves compressing the time during which one eats over a short period (6-8 h) and “fasting” the rest of the day (16-18 h). Intermittent fasting has positive effects on weight and body fat loss, chronic inflammation, metabolism, and cardiovascular health (see our articles on the subject here and here). The main metabolic benefits of intermittent fasting are reduced blood LDL cholesterol levels, increased insulin sensitivity and better blood glucose control in diabetics, reduced oxidative stress and inflammation. On the one hand, we know that an imbalance in the intestinal microbiota (intestinal dysbiosis) contributes to the development of hypertension. On the other hand, studies in recent years have shown that fasting and caloric restriction significantly reduce blood pressure, both in animal models and in hypertensive patients.

A recent study shows that the beneficial effects of intermittent fasting on blood pressure are attributable, at least in part, to the modulation of the gut microbiota. The researchers used an animal model commonly used in hypertension research: spontaneously hypertensive stroke-prone (SHRSP) rats, a unique genetic model of severe hypertension and stroke. Hypertensive SHRSP rats and normotensive Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats were subjected for 8 weeks to one or the other of the following diets: 1) ad libitum throughout the study (control groups) or 2) a diet alternating a day with food at will and a day without access to food (intermittent fasting). Hypertensive (SHRSP) and normotensive (WKY) rats in the control groups ingested the same amount of food. In contrast, the rats subjected to intermittent fasting ate more on days with food at will than those in the control groups, presumably to compensate for the fasting day. Despite this, the total amount of food ingested during the study was significantly lower in hypertensive (-27%) and normotensive (-35%) rats subjected to intermittent fasting, compared to animals in the respective control groups that had access to food at will. Despite a similar food intake, the hypertensive rats in the control group gained significantly less weight than the normotensive rats.

As expected, the blood pressure of hypertensive rats measured weekly was significantly higher than that of normotensive rats. In contrast, intermittent fasting significantly reduced blood pressure in hypertensive rats by an average of about 40 mmHg by the end of the study, compared to hypertensive rats who had access to food at will. This significant decrease brought the blood pressure of hypertensive rats to levels comparable to those of normotensive rats.

Role of the gut microbiota in the regulation of blood pressure
Animal models allow experiments on the role of the gut microbiota that could not be done in humans. In order to find out whether the gut microbiota plays a role in the effect of intermittent fasting, the researchers continued their studies by “transplanting” the microbiota from hypertensive and normotensive rats into “germ-free” rats, i.e. rats reproduced under special conditions in such a way that they do not contain any microorganisms.

Germ-free rats that received microbiota from hypertensive rats had significantly higher blood pressure than those that received microbiota from normotensive rats when subjected to the control diet (ad libitum). In contrast, intermittent fasting reduced the blood pressure of germ-free rats that received microbiota from hypertensive rats to levels comparable to those of rats that received microbiota from normotensive rats. These results demonstrate that the alterations in the microbiota of hypertensive rats caused by intermittent fasting are sufficient to cause a reduction in blood pressure. Analysis of the microbiota by whole-genome shotgun sequencing has enabled researchers to identify bile acid metabolism as a potential mediator of blood pressure regulation. Subsequent analyses revealed that the blood levels of 11 bile acids (out of 18) in hypertensive SHRSP rats were significantly lower than those in normotensive rats. In support of the hypothesis, the addition of cholic acid (a precursor of bile acids) in the food or the activation of the bile acid receptor (TGR5) significantly reduced the blood pressure (by 18 mmHg) of hypertensive rats.

In summary, the quality of food and frequency with which we eat has a significant impact on the microorganisms in our microbiota, cardiometabolic risk factors and, ultimately, our overall health. By changing the diet and the frequency of meals, it may be possible to significantly improve the condition of people with chronic diseases.